Minneapolis City Council Approves Restraining Order for Police

Terms of a temporary restraining order outlines changes that must be implemented by the Minneapolis Police Department

June 5, reported by the City of Minneapolis

photo by Gaea Dill D’Ascoli

The Minneapolis City Council approved the terms of a stipulation for a temporary restraining order today outlining immediate changes that must be implemented by the Minneapolis Police Department and a framework for systemic change as part of the long-term investigation underway by Minnesota Department of Human Rights.

The Minnesota Department of Human Rights launched an investigation into the Minneapolis Police Department June 2 after filing a civil rights charge related to the death of George Floyd. The investigation into policies, procedures and practices over the past 10 years will determine if the MPD has engaged in systematic discriminatory practices toward people of color and ensure any such practices are stopped.

The order specifies that MPD and the City must implement the following measures immediately:

Today, the Governor announced that his administration and the City of Minneapolis have agreed on immediate changes to the Minneapolis Police Department (MPD)’s policies. In an unprecedented move, the Minnesota Department of Human Rights filed an emergency court action and an agreed proposed court order that details immediate structural changes that the MPD must begin to implement. The City of Minneapolis agreed to implement structural changes and joined the Minnesota Department of Human Rights in submitting the court order.

Under the proposed court order, the City of Minneapolis agrees to the following terms:

  • Chokeholds are immediately banned;
  • Police officers have a duty to report and intervene if another officer utilizes an unauthorized use of force;
  • The use of crowd control weapons during protests and demonstrations may only be approved by the Chief of Police;
  • Timely and transparent discipline decisions for police officers must be made; and
  • Body camera footage may be audited by the Minneapolis Civil Rights Department.

The proposed court order also requires the MPD to comply with the ongoing civil rights investigation by the Minnesota Department of Human Rights. 

The City will prepare a report listing all of the State of Minnesota laws that impede public transparency of police data and/or prevent the mayor and police chief and/or impede civilian oversight from disciplining and terminating police officers who do not adhere to Minneapolis Police Department policies and standards. The report is due by July 30, 2020.

Minnesotans with information that can further the investigation into the MPD should contact the Department of Human Rights at mn.gov/mdhr or 651-539-1100


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