Marie Olofsdotter, Cover Artist July 2017

We reconnected with a few past cover artists and asked them to share an update on their lives and art.

A lot has happened in the world and in my personal life since my article was published in the Minnesota Women’s Press in 2017. In June 2019, I experienced a total burnout. My mother passed away in 2018. After a busy year of teaching following that, I began to experience extreme fatigue and brain fog. My body rebelled and I could only work on my art for a few hours a day. I shifted my focus from painting to mixed media: cut and paste to begin with, then little by little, I added layers and texture.

I started teaching again in the late fall of 2019, but when schools closed in March due to COVID, I was unable to continue my work as a teaching artist. I made mixed media artists journals as a way to process this massive shift. Out of that work grew an idea of making inspirational tags. I wanted to place them in Free Libraries around town as a gift for my community. Then the riots happened, yet another massive shift prompting me to add words of empowerment to the tags — breathe, rise, strong roots, earth magic — to give hope in a time of uncertainty and collective trauma. But since my town was burning, I shared the tags as giveaways with friends rather than placing them in Free Libraries, and still make them to inspire joie de vivre.

The world has changed, but my intent as an artist remains the same. Through my work, I strive to inspire awareness, healing energy, and a loving relationship with the planet Earth. I try to evoke a place full of magic — a poetic space that fuels the heart.


Details: marieolofsdotter.com


When Minnesota Women’s Press transitioned from a newspaper format to a monthly magazine in 2009, the publication began showcasing Minnesota women artists on the cover each month. They worked in many mediums, and were at various stages of their careers.

In our “35 Years of Minnesota Women’s Press” book, former publishers Norma Smith Olson and Kathy Magnuson write, “We looked for artwork that made a strong statement about being a woman, and often artwork that represented the theme of the monthly issue — from women’s bodies, homes and environments, spiritualities, politics, fitness and health, and what nourishes women.”

For this issue, we reconnected with a few past cover artists and asked them to share an update on their lives and art.

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